Friday, September 22, 2017

"Listen Up"

6 x 8"
oil on panel


A small study - two young ladies grooving on Interrupted Reading by Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot in the Art Institute of Chicago.

Please click here to the auction page.  Auction ends October 2nd, 9 pm ET.


Monday, September 18, 2017

"Under Cover"

9 x 12"
oil on panel


A new painting fresh off the easel - a woman viewing Edmund Tarbell's Preparing For The Matinee in the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Please click here for a larger view and purchase/contact information.


Monday, September 4, 2017

"Daisies Like This"

6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


I hope you've enjoyed your Labor Day weekend.

I've been painting studies all week including this new piece I finished this evening.  A woman viewing a painting in the Art Institute of Chicago - one that always makes me smile - Henri Matisse's Daisies.




Tuesday, August 29, 2017

There IS something you can do for pets


You can donate to the Humane Society's Disaster Relief Fund
to help animals in need.

Here is the link.

And a friend suggested Compassion-First Pet Hospitals -
they are matching donations dollar for dollar.

Here is their link.


Sunday, August 27, 2017

"Overheads"

6 x 6" 
oil on panel
sold


From the Art Institute of Chicago, museum patrons waiting in line to an exhibit underneath one of Ellsworth Kelly's The Chicago Panels.

The Chicago Panels were commissioned specifically for the walls on the floor above the American Art sculpture court - consisting of six painted, monochromatic, curved aluminum panels. 


Please consider donating to the Red Cross and the Salvation Army to help people affected by Hurricane Harvey.  You can donate here to the Red Cross and donate here to the Salvation Army


Donate today


Donate to the Red Cross today.  Donate to the Salvation Army today.
Help these people.




Friday, August 25, 2017

"Suit Yourself"

6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


The Belgium artist, Rene Magritte clearly had a sense of humor.

Magritte's earliest paintings date back to 1915 - and like most artists of that time period, he dabbled in different styles, beginning with Impressionism, Cubism, Fauvism then Surrealism after becoming involved with a group of surrealists in Paris.  Meanwhile, to earn a living, he ran an advertising agency back in Brussels, continued painting in a more painterly style - even earned a living at one time producing fake Picassos and Braques and believe it or not, forged banknotes during the postwar period. 

The Son of Man was completed in 1964 as a self-portrait.  The hovering, green apple obsures most of his face, as Magritte explained 'Everything we see hides another thing, we always want to see what is hidden by what we see.  There is an interest in that which is hidden and which the visible does not show us.  This interest can take the form of a quite intense feeling, a sort of conflict, one might say, between the visible that is hidden and the visible that is present'.

The Son of Man has been parodied multiple times in literature, film and artworks - notably a few - Norman Rockwell painted a homage titled Mr. Apple, the Simpsons had Bart behind a floating apple, and the film The Thomas Crown Affair included the painting in several scenes.


Tuesday, August 22, 2017

"Whistler Stop"

9 x 12"
oil on panel
sold


I've talked a little bit about the artist James McNeill Whistler on this blog.  Of course his most famous painting is Whistler's Mother.

Whistler entered The White Girl in the Paris Salon in 1863 where it was rejected by the 'tradition-bound' jury.  Napoleon III held his own Salon des Refuses, an exhibition of artworks that had be rejected elsewhere.  It was hugely controversial - an exhibition for the avant-garde artists - how dare he.  The White Girl was met with severe public ridicule but his fellow artists and some critics loved it.  One art critic referred to it as a 'symphony in white' and Whistler loved that reference to music so much so he retitled a number of previous paintings - including The White Girl, renamed Symphony in White, No. 1.  Whistler went on to complete two more painting of women in white dresses titled Symphony in White, No. 2 and 3.

James Whistler continued with a more limited palette, like The White Girl and Self-Portrait (there on the left) and Arrangement in Grey and Black, No. 1, also known as Whistler's Mother.

From the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC, a woman viewing Whistler's Symphony in White, No. 1: The White Girl.

Please click here for a larger view.


Monday, August 21, 2017

The Dark Side of the Moon



Enjoy it.  Wherever you are.


'Solar Eclipse' by Yuri Shwedoff


Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Reposting an Important One

6 x 6"
oil on panel
sold


Norman Rockwell's profound 1964 painting 'The Problem We All Live With' is on the top of my Rockwell list.  It depicts 6-year-old Ruby Bridges, an African-American girl, being escorted to an all-white public school in New Orleans, by four deputy U.S. marshalls.  What is so very effective is the viewer is seeing the point of view from the angry crowd, the hint being the racial slurs on the wall and the tomato splattered in between the figures.  

The image was published in a 1964 issue of Look magazine - Rockwell's contract with the Saturday Evening Post ended in 1963 due to Rockwell's continued frustration with the magazine's limitations on his expressions of progressive social interests, including his personal views on civil rights and racial integration.

Norman Rockwell's granddaughter, Abigail, recently wrote a compelling article in the Huffington Post titled Would There Be Norman Rockwell Without The Saturday Evening Post?  Rockwell undoubtedly evolved as an illustrator between 1916 and 1963 - becoming a storyteller with his images like no other.  His career with the Post yielded 322 covers before he ended his contract.

Ruby Bridges, at the age of 56, visited the painting in the White House in 2011 - at the request of President Obama.




The CNN writer, Bob Greene, wrote about that event in this article.  Within that article, these words struck me "..the message of the painting is so powerful that it goes well beyond the incident it portrays. The message transcends our usual Democrats-vs.-Republicans, conservatives-vs.-liberals, left-vs.-right squabbling.  Rockwell was a genius not just because of the technical skill of his artistry, but because of his eye for the telling detail. And in "The Problem We All Live With," the key detail is how he framed the four U.S. marshals who are accompanying that child to school. We do not see their faces; in the painting, the men are cropped at their shoulders.

That is the power and the story of the painting: Four men were accompanying Bridges to school, yes, but the point was, the United States of America was accompanying her. We see the men's "Deputy U.S. Marshal" armbands, and that is what matters. The painting tells us: This country may have its flaws, but when right and wrong are on the line, the nation, in the end, usually chooses to stand for right."






Saturday, August 12, 2017

"Hip To"

6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


A woman stands in front of Mark Rothko's No. 3/No. 13 in the Museum of Modern Art, New York City.





Tuesday, August 8, 2017

"Girls With Pearls"

6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


I was simply inspired to paint this new piece after I turned on the movie Girl with a Pearl Earring - which, by the way, is an artist's dream of a beautifully visual film.  Every minute is a painting.

Johannes Vermeer was a moderately successful Dutch painter in the 17th century - specializing in domestic scenes in his own middle-class life.   He painted slow and infrequently and insisted on using expensive paints but his signature element was light.

Vermeer wasn't a wealthy man - but his future mother-in-law was wealthy and insisted Johannes convert to Catholicism before marrying her daughter Catharina - and with her help, Vermeer was able to pursue painting.   The couple went on to have eleven children, all who were left penniless and in debt after his death at age 43.

Vermeer's works were hardly known outside of Amsterdam until the 19th century - imagine that.  His famous painting Girl with a Pearl Earring hangs in The Hague in the Netherlands.


Saturday, August 5, 2017

"Repose"

6 x 6"
oil on panel
sold


I spent a WEEK on a painting - yikes - then took a few days off and today I really, really enjoyed painting loose for a change.  I concentrated less on the art and more on the space.  

A woman resting on a bench in the French Impressionists gallery in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.



Thursday, July 27, 2017

"Surrender"

8 x 6"
oil on panel
sold


I can truly say this is where I'd like to be.

A woman sunbathing on the beach on Hilton Head Island.




Tuesday, July 25, 2017

"Call It a Night"

10 x 10"
oil on panel
sold


If you have a bucket list, add seeing the painting Nighthawks by Edward Hopper in the Art Institute of Chicago.  

Hopper's iconic painting done in 1942 is one of the most recognizable paintings in American art.  Hopper and his wife Jo attended an exhibit of paintings by Henri Rousseau at the Museum of Modern Art - about a month after Nighthawks was hung in a New York gallery - and in attendance was Daniel Catton Rich, the director of the Art Institute of Chicago and Alfred Barr, the director of MOMA.  Jo told Barr he just had to go see Edward's new painting Nighthawks.  It was Rich who went to see it shortly after and purchased it for $3000 and the painting has hung in the Art Institute ever since.

Please click here for a larger view.




Thursday, July 20, 2017

"An Invitation"

6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


A young woman is seemingly being invited to play on the beach in Joaquin Sorolla's Two Sisters, Valencia in the Art Institute of Chicago.




Sunday, July 16, 2017

"Express Yourself"

9 x 12"
oil on panel


Mark Rothko was a complex, educated man and it would be futile for me to even begin to analyze his paintings, especially the color fields in his abstract expressionism works.  I will include a quote from Rothko that does it for me - "The fact that people break down and cry when confronted with my pictures shows that I can communicate those basic human emotions.  The people who weep before my pictures are having the same religious experience I had when painting them.  And if you say you are moved only by their color relationships then you miss the point."

A young man stands before Mark Rothko's Untitled, (Purple, White and Red) in the Art Institute of Chicago.

Please click here for a larger view and purchase/contact information.


Monday, July 10, 2017

"From Their Perspective"

6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


I enjoyed loosening up with this new painting - two young women resting on a bench in front of Mark Rothko's Untitled, (Purple, White and Red) in the Art Institute of Chicago.




"Puppy Zen"

12 x 12"
oil on panel


These are my darling pups, Zac and Joey, when they were about four months old.  

I know, it's out there for me.





Wednesday, July 5, 2017

"Get With The Program"

6 x 6"
oil on panel
sold


I love this painting.

From the Art Institute of Chicago, a couple rests on a marble bench in the Art Institute of Chicago.




Thursday, June 29, 2017

"Starstruck"

8 x 10"
oil on panel


This is how most people look at a painting by Joan Miro.  A bit puzzled maybe.

The Spanish painter, born in 1893, lived a long life until the age of 90 - which meant he lived as a painter and sculptor through many art movements of the 20th century - surrealism, dadaism, fauvism, magical realism, experimentalism and modernism.  Miro expressed contempt for conventional painting methods as a way of supporting bourgeois society, famously declaring an 'assassination of painting' in favor of upsetting the visual elements of established painting'.  Add Joan Miro to the long list of artists who were sent off to a private school and sooned decided they wanted to be a painter rather than what their father wanted them to be.

Miro's painting above is titled Personages with Star.  You might ask what is a personage.  According to Miro, after hunger-induced hallucinations, he began a series of 'dream paintings', exploring surrealism, including what he called enigmatic signs or personages - based on real things but in his own form.  The man was unique.

Like his mentor, Pablo Picasso, Miro was deeply involved in politics.  In a 1936 interview, with the Spanish civil war looming, he spoke of the need to 'resist all societies... if the aim is to impose their demands on us.  The word 'freedom' has meaning for me and I will defend it at any cost.'  When asked about the death of General Franco in 1975 and what he had done to promote opposition to the Spanish dictator who ruled for nearly 40 years, he answered 'free and violent things.'  

From the Art Institute of Chicago, a woman closely studying Joan Miro's Personages with Star.

Please click here for a larger view and purchasing/contact information.




Saturday, June 24, 2017

"The Light Of Day"

6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


And a happy summer to you.

I've been busy going places but now I'm home and back to painting.  Yay.

Back in my frame shop days, I made it a point to have a framed Georgia O'Keeffe print on the wall - especially her New York skyscrapers.  I had a guy come in one day, swore I was mistaken that the painting you see above, The Shelton with Sunspots, N.Y. was NOT an O'Keeffe.  He insisted she only painted flowers and desert scenes.  Yep, that's what he said.

O'Keeffe created a series of New York skyscrapers between 1925 and 1929 after she and Alfred Stieglitz moved into the Shelton Hotel, on the 30th floor where she had a perfect view of the northern, eastern and southern cityscapes.  Her painting above depicts an optical illusion where there appeared to be "a bite out of one side of the tower made by the sun, with sunspots against the building and against the sky".

After 1929, O'Keeffe was unhappy with city life and marriage and moved to New Mexico, where she found new inspiration in the southwest landscapes, never to revisit the subject of skyscrapers again.

From the Art Institute of Chicago, a woman stands next to Georgia O'Keeffe's The Shelton with Sunspots, N.Y.




Sunday, June 11, 2017

"Lend Me Your Ear" (study)

6 x 6"
oil on panel
sold


I've written about Vincent van Gogh in past posts and still I can't get over the fact that this brilliant artist completed nearly 900 paintings, 1,100 drawings and countless etchings between the ages of 28 through 37 years old.  And the majority of paintings were done in the last two years of his life.  And.... he only sold one painting in his lifetime.  Remarkable.

Van Gogh painted 30 self-portraits during the last several years of his life - in large part to not being able to pay a model.  Each and every portrait gives the viewer great insight to his state at that time.  The self-portrait above was done in 1887 while he lived in France and largely due to being influenced by the young artist, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, van Gogh approached this painting with the play between the complimentary colors of blue-greens and the orange-reds.  He adopted elements of Pointillism, using small, colored strokes inside the background and clothing, something that can't be seen from a distance, but up close, is so very effective.  

From the Art Institute of Chicago,  a man closely views Vincent van Gogh's Self-Portrait.  This is a small study of a larger version I am currently working on - I wanted to make sure I could get the tilt of the man's head right before I tackled a larger painting.



Thursday, June 8, 2017

"Subtropical"

6 x 6"
oil on panel
sold


I've been in an experimental mode with this idea.  On several occasions, I've seen blown up wall murals - some in museums advertising exhibitions, some on sides of buildings, some on television during live concerts or speeches, etc.  It really captures my attention.  So I've been playing with scale and people and it's been great fun, resulting in a study of one I'd like to do a bit larger.

Feel free to tell me what you think.

The mural behind the woman on the bench is Paul Gauguin's Aha Oe Feii? or Are You Jealous?.  Painted in 1892 from his adventures in Tahiti, the title refers to a conversation between two sisters about love and conquests, causing one to say What? Are you jealous? after one claimed she got lucky the night before and the other did not.  

Gauguin went to Tahiti with expectations of paradise and Tahitian culture but discovered those preconceived notions were disappearing fast with Roman Catholic and Protestant missionaries moving in on the natives.  It was then his goal to spend the next twelve years recreating the idyllic world in paintings, engravings and sculptures.


Thursday, June 1, 2017

"Come Across"

5 x 7"
oil on panel
sold


I'm really late for dinner but I wanted to post this new painting that includes one of my personal favorites of Georgia O'Keeffe, Black Cross, New Mexico in the Art Institute of Chicago.  To her left is The Black Place.